Universiteit van Amsterdam

Events

Institute for Logic, Language and Computation

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18-19 August 2014, 5th AISB Workshop on "Figurative language: its patterns and meanings in domain-specific discourse", Birmingham, U.K.

Date: 18-19 August 2014
Location: Birmingham, U.K.
Deadline: 9 June 2014

Forms of figurative language such as metaphor and metonymy are key resources for communicating domain-specific information in an accessible way. Modelling such patterns of communication is a key aim of academic disciplines such as linguistics, discourse studies, and psycholinguistics, and understanding such phenomena is an emerging goal within Artificial Intelligence and the related field of Natural Language Processing. A particularly interesting current area of research is work on automatically generating as well as understanding metaphor, which are both emerging as important sites for addressing long-standing problems in linguistics, artificial intelligence, and cognitive science.

To facilitate communication about such efforts, we are planning a two-day workshop on modelling the meanings and patterns of health and political conflict, where discourse in these domains typically gives rise to some of the richest and most figurative forms of human discourse. The workshop will take place at the University of Birmingham, and will be jointly organized through the University's Institute for Advanced Studies (IAS) as well as the Society for the Study of Artificial Intelligence and Simulation of Behaviour (AISB).

For more information, see http://www.cs.bham.ac.uk/~gargetad/

We are calling for 500 word abstracts for presentations at this workshop, which may report research in progress, as well as more finished research. To coincide with IAS activities over lapping with the workshop, we are also planning a special session on the morning of the second day dedicated to corpus and computational resources, such as FrameNet, WordNet, Propbank, and Ontonotes (to name a few), and if you wish to present in this, please mark your abstract as for the "Special Session". Abstracts of no more than 500 words (plus references, if desired) are to be submitted by 9th June.

Please note that this newsitem has been archived, and may contain outdated information or links.