Universiteit van Amsterdam

ILLC News & Events

Institute for Logic, Language and Computation

ILLC News & Events

These pages provide information about recent developments at or relevant to the ILLC. Please let us know if you have material that you would like to be added to the news pages, by using the online submission form. For minor updates to existing entries you can also email the news administrators directly. English submissions strongly preferred.

Sections

Headlines ILLC News

Headlines ILLC Events this week

ILLC News

ILLC Events this week

  • 29 January 2020, Master of Logic defense, Shimpei Endo

    Title: Modal Spatialism
    Date & Time: Wednesday 29 January 2020, 15:00
    Location: Room F1.15, Science Park 107, Amsterdam
    Supervisor: Arthur Schipper
  • (New) 4 February 2020, DIP Colloquium, Daniel Rothschild

    Speaker: Daniel Rothschild
    Title: Lockean Belief, Dutch Books, and Scoring Systems
    Date & Time: Tuesday 4 February 2020, 16:00-17:30
    Location: ILLC Seminar Room F1.15, Science Park 107, Amsterdam
  • (New) 4 February 2020, joint EXPRESS-DiP Colloquium, Daniel Rotschild

    Speaker: Daniel Rotschild (UCL)
    Title: Lockean Belief, Dutch Books, and Scoring Systems
    Date & Time: Tuesday 4 February 2020, 16:00-17:30
    Location: ILLC Seminar Room F1.15, Science Park 107, Amsterdam

    On the Lockean thesis one ought to believe a proposition if and only if one assigns it a credence at or above a threshold (Foley 1992). The Lockean thesis, thus, provides a way of linking sets of all-or-nothing beliefs with credences. Recent work on the lexical semantics of attitude verbs such a 'think’ and ‘believe’ suggest that Lockeanism is more plausible than the view that believing a proposition requires having full confidence in it (Hawthorne, Rothschild and Spectre, 2016). In this talk, I will give two independent characterizations of sets of full beliefs satisfying the Lockean thesis. One is in terms of betting dispositions associated with full beliefs and one is in terms of an accuracy scoring system for full beliefs. These characterizations are parallel to, but not merely derivative from, the more familiar Dutch book (de Finetti 1974) and accuracy arguments (Joyce 1998) for probabilism.