Universiteit van Amsterdam

Events

Institute for Logic, Language and Computation

News and Events: Upcoming Events

These pages provide information about recent developments at or relevant to the ILLC. Please let us know if you have material that you would like to be added to the news pages, by using the online submission form. For minor updates to existing entries you can also email the news administrators directly. English submissions strongly preferred.

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Headlines Upcoming Events

Upcoming Events

  • 28 May 2020, Logic and Interactive Rationality (LIRa), Chenwei Shi

    Speaker: Chenwei Shi (Department of Philosophy, Tsinghua University, Beijing)
    Title: Logic of Convex Order (Joint work with Yang Sun)
    Date: Thursday 28 May 2020
    Location: Online
  • (New) 3 June 2020, Algebra|Coalgebra Seminar, Matias Menni

    Speaker: Matias Menni (Conicet and Universidad Nacional de La Plata)
    Title: Separable MV-algebras (Joint work with V. Marra)
    Date & Time: Wednesday 3 June 2020, 16:00-17:00
    Location: Online
    For more information, see https://events.illc.uva.nl/alg-coalg or contact Jan Rooduijn at .
  • (New) 10 June 2020, Algebra|Coalgebra Seminar, Luca Carai

    Speaker: Luca Carai (New Mexico State University)
    Date & Time: Wednesday 10 June 2020, 16:00-17:00
    Location: Online
    For more information, see https://events.illc.uva.nl/alg-coalg or contact Jan Rooduijn at .
  • 11 June 2020, Logic and Interactive Rationality (LIRa), Tobias Blanke

    Speaker: Tobias Blanke
    Title: Where are the humanities in AI research? – a research agenda
    Date: Thursday 11 June 2020
    Location: Online
  • 18 June 2020, Logic and Interactive Rationality (LIRa), Jörg Endrullis

    Speaker: Jörg Endrullis
    Date & Time: Thursday 18 June 2020, 16:30-18:00
    Location: Online
  • 32nd European Summer School in Logic, Language and Information (ESSLLI 2020) cancelled/postponed

    Location: Utrecht, The Netherlands
    Deadline: Saturday 1 June 2019

    Under the auspices of FoLLI the European Summer School in Logic, Language, and Information (ESSLLI) is organized every year in a different European country. It takes place over two weeks in the European Summer, hosts approximately 50 different courses at both the introductory and advanced levels, attracting around 400 participants each year from all the world.

    The main focus of the program of the summer schools is the interface between linguistics, logic and computation, with special emphasis in human linguistic and cognitive ability. Courses, both introductory and advanced, cover a wide variety of topics within the combined areas of interest: Logic and Computation, Computation and Language, and Language and Logic. Workshops are also organized, providing opportunities for in-depth discussion of issues at the forefront of research, as well as a series of invited lectures.

    Unfortunately, the circumstances around the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic forced the organizers to postpone the 32nd edition of ESSLLI, planned for 2020 in Utrecht. Together with the organisers of the 33rd ESSLLI (planned for 2021 in Galway, Ireland), the organisers are investigating whether they can postpone the 32nd ESSLLI to 2021.

    For more information, see https://www.esslli.eu or contact .
  • 10 - 14 August 2020, Computational and Experimental Explanations in Semantics and Pragmatics

    Date: 10 - 14 August 2020
    Location: Utrecht
    Deadline: Saturday 15 February 2020

    The field of natural language semantics has undergone what some refer to as an ‘experimental turn’ and is arguably currently undergoing a ‘computational turn’. By expanding the toolbox available to the semanticist, these two turns have the effect of expanding the phenomena that can be explained and the varieties of semantic explanation that can be offered.

    For example, experimental methods can help distinguish between alternative explanations of semantic effects, e.g. whether to classify controversial phenomena as implicatures or presuppositions. Similarly, computational models of semantics can generate fine-grained and non-categorical predictions that can fruitfully be tested experimentally. And both kinds of methods can be used to ask questions about the emergence of semantic structures in language, including which factors influence their distribution and typology.

    Given this wider toolbox and purview, we aim to gather a workshop to showcase exciting new work that develops new semantic explanations using experimental and computational methods, as well as to invite broader reflection on the methodology of semantics now and in its future.