Universiteit van Amsterdam

Events

Institute for Logic, Language and Computation

Please note that this newsitem has been archived, and may contain outdated information or links.

17-19 April 2015, Truth Pluralism and Logical Pluralism, Storrs CT, U.S.A.

Date: 17-19 April 2015
Location: Storrs CT, U.S.A.
Deadline: 15 February 2015

The Philosophy Department at the University of Connecticut in partnership with the Pluralisms Global Research Network funded by the National Research Foundation of Korea is delighted to announce a conference on *Truth Pluralism and Logical Pluralism*, to be held from April 17-19, 2015, at the University of Connecticut, Storrs.

What does a mean for a sentence or proposition to be true? Can there be more than one way for something to be true? What does it mean for a logic to be "correct", and can there be multiple equally correct logics? This conference is aimed at exploring issues in pluralisms about truth and logic and their rival theories, as well as the connections between them.

If you have any questions, please contact the conference organiser, Nathan Kellen <>. For more information and a registration form, see http://philosophy.uconn.edu/ and http://www.nikolajpedersen.com/pluralisms.html. While the conference is free and open to the public, registration is required. Please register by April 1st, using the registration form at http://www.nathankellen.com/.

We will also have room for 2-3 contributed papers. We invite submissions of *full papers*, suitable for 35 minute presentation. Please submit the paper, in .pdf format and formatted for blind review, as well as a separate cover sheet with contact information. Papers should be submitted to Nathan Kellen , by *11:59PM EST on February 15th, 2015*. Papers should address the topic of the conference, and papers addressing the connections between truth pluralism and logical pluralism are especially welcome. We encourage submissions from all scholars, including early career researchers and graduate students and especially those from underrepresented groups in philosophy.

Please note that this newsitem has been archived, and may contain outdated information or links.